Test of locking and safety systems. Photo: Anna Sigge

Differences in effectiveness and safety

The incinerating toilets from Cinderella incinerate excrement both best and safest in Testfakta's test. Three competing toilets more or less fail on the safety side.

The electrical incinerating toilet is an increasingly common alternative to the summer house owner’s outhouse and other systems based on biological degradation. The incinerating toilet does not need a water supply. The whole idea is that urine and faeces is incinerated at a high temperature of about 600 °C. The ashes, which are completely odour-free, are collected in a container and can usefully be emptied in the garden where they operate as fertilizer.

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Testfakta Research has, on behalf of Fritidstoa, commissioned a comparative laboratory testing of electrical incinerating toilets. The purpose of the test is to compare the ease of use, performance, and safety of Fritidstoa’s model, Cinderella Comfort, with the three competing brands on the Swedish market. The laboratory test has been carried out by SMP Svensk Maskinprovning in Alnarp, Skåne, and includes the following elements: manageability, performance and safety.
In the manageability element, the laboratory has among other things considered the manufacturers’ instructions for installation, application of toilet bags and how easy it is to get at and empty the ash pan.

According to the laboratory, a professional should carry out the installation if you are not “very handy”.
Bengt-Göran Pripp is a test technician at SMP in Alnarp and has worked on the test.
– The toilet itself is easy to connect. It only takes a grounded plug to make it work. And if it’s in an old outhouse most people could probably manage to saw holes for the chimney and ventilation. But if it’s in areas that require work in insulated walls or ceilings it will, of course, be more difficult. Then it may be easier to bring in someone who has the right tools.

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Installation of the toilets. Photo: Anna Sigge

In the performance element, the laboratory has compared ability to effectively incinerate faecal matter and urine by simulating more and less demanding user scenarios. The test has simulated everything from cold start to a simulated toilet queue of up to six people. The test showed that the Cinderella toilet clearly had the most effective incineration. Several of the toilets in the test had problems with incineration in the more demanding operations where Cinderella did not leave any unburned residues. Energy consumption for a “flush” is on average about 1.5 kWh. However, it is important to be aware that the toilets suck in significant amounts of air during the incineration process, which can affect indoor environmental quality. What sets Cinderella Comfort apart from the other toilets is that it takes air from outside and thus has no impact on indoor environmental quality.

In the safety evaluation, the laboratory found a number of more and less remarkable deficiencies in all the toilets in the test. The most serious criticism is given to the toilets from Toamoa, Separett and Incinolet. These toilets have a technical solution that makes it possible to flush while sitting on the toilet. The incinerator hatch opens when flushing, which entails a risk of exposure to flames and a “theoretical” risk of contact with heated components. The same three toilets also lack a locking system that prevents the incineration process from starting if the ash pan is not installed.

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Measurement of temperature around the ash pan. Photo: Anna Sigge

Despite the safety weaknesses found, all of the toilets meet the requirements for CE marking. The question for the consumer is how reliable CE marking really is.
Bengt-Göran Pripp of SMP expresses himself diplomatically:
– It is not our job to comment on CE marking. It is the manufacturer’s responsibility. Our task is to review the toilets based on a sort of standard. In doing so, we have also seen these risks. They will clearly be smaller if everyone follow the instructions, but we cannot ignore the fact that an open incineration chamber carries a risk, for example, for anyone wearing flammable clothing.

Testfakta Research

April 23, 2014

 

Read more here:'Facts about the test'

Facts about the test

Testfakta Research has, on behalf of Fritidstoa, commissioned a comparative laboratory testing of electric incinerating toilets.

The laboratory test includes the following main elements:

1.Installation

2. Ease-of-use

3. Performance

4. Safety

For more information on test methods and test results, please continue reading here.

 

 Electric incinerating toilet

An electric incinerating toilet is a toilet where urine, faeces and toilet paper (waste) is incinerated at a high temperature.  Incineration occurs by the waste being heated to a temperature of about 600 °C. Flue gas is directed out through a degassing pipe. Oxygen for incineration is supplied from either the indoor space or directly from the outside. To ensure oxygen supply and extraction of flue gas, the toilets are equipped with a fan. The ashes after the incineration are collected in the incinerator container (ash pan). Incineration is effective and the amount of ash is limited.

 

 

Facts about the test

Testfakta Research has, on behalf of Fritidstoa, commissioned a comparative laboratory testing of electric incinerating toilets.

The laboratory test includes the following main elements:

1.Installation

2. Ease-of-use

3. Performance

4. Safety

For more information on test methods and test results, please continue reading here.

 

 Electric incinerating toilet

An electric incinerating toilet is a toilet where urine, faeces and toilet paper (waste) is incinerated at a high temperature.  Incineration occurs by the waste being heated to a temperature of about 600 °C. Flue gas is directed out through a degassing pipe. Oxygen for incineration is supplied from either the indoor space or directly from the outside. To ensure oxygen supply and extraction of flue gas, the toilets are equipped with a fan. The ashes after the incineration are collected in the incinerator container (ash pan). Incineration is effective and the amount of ash is limited.